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Huawei flagship checked for US blacklisted parts


The economic crisis and the start of the recession are notinfluenced the stringent restrictions imposed by the US government on Huawei. Sanctions on the supply of a Chinese company of component parts continued to apply at the time of the launch of the flagship smartphone model Huawei P40. The enthusiasts of the XYZone resource performed a detailed disassembly of the P40 device in order to verify how effective the US sanctions against the Chinese company turned out to be and the American manufacturers themselves adhered to the embargo.

As a result of a complete disassembly of the flagship Huaweiit turned out that the smartphone used radio modules from Qualcomm, Skyworks and Qorvo, designed to make phone calls and establish an Internet connection. Earlier, the US government eased some sanctions restrictions and allowed US manufacturers to supply parts for Huawei, subject to a special license, and in case the Chinese do not use these parts in the production of new products.



Experts say Qualcomm haslicensed to supply Huawei parts for electronic devices. Meanwhile, Qorvo and Skyworks do not confirm, but do not deny the existence of special permissions for working with Huawei. According to the results of the disassembly of the device Huawei P40, experts also concluded that the company significantly increased the number of parts manufactured in South Korea and in China itself.


Huawei comments indicate that the companyalways adheres to the export laws of countries with which business cooperation is conducted. Regarding the situation with the United States, a Huawei spokesman emphasized that all parts in all devices manufactured by the company were legally acquired. It also appeared that Huawei is changing completely replaced the flash memory modules from the American Micron Technology with chips manufactured in South Korea by Samsung. At the same time, market analysts believe that next year Huawei will face even more serious tests related to US sanctions.

Source: arstechnica